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Snake Removal & Control

Sometimes living in Florida can be compared to living in an episode of National Geographic. It’s extremely hot, we have gigantic, flying insects, 10’ alligators swimming in our lakes and rivers, dangerous gangs of killer red ants building colonies in our lawns, bears running free, raccoons stealing our trash, you name it, we have it!…well….we don’t have lions, but we DO have cougars! And if that’s not enough to scare you, then maybe this will. Florida is home to 46 NATIVE species of snakes. That’s right! Forty-six! Six of which are venomous. And guess what else? Four of those six venomous snakes live right here in good ‘ol Central Florida. And there’s no shortage of them! So hold on to your white gloves and black eared hats Orlando-nites because right now, as you read this, somewhere, in some nearby river, a cottonmouth is out there! Oh yeah, he’s watching…he’s waiting…he’s skimming the waters, waiting patiently for you to FLIP OVER IN YOUR CANOE! And then it’s LIGHTS OUT! Well…not really, but the thought of snakes swimming in our common waterways still gives us the heebie jeebies. So we thought we’d lend a helping hand and provide a comprehensive list below of all the snakes that reside in Central Florida, poisonous and non-poisonous, to help you identify any slithery serpents that you might come across on your daily travels.

Also, we are here to help if you if you do spot one. If you think you may have a snake on your property or if you’ve seen any recurring snake activity, we are always just a phone call away. One of our trained wildlife technicians will be more than happy to stop by, trap and remove the snake from your property…as long as it’s not a man eating Anaconda. But lucky for us, we don’t have Anacondas in Central Florida…yet.

Venomous

  1. Eastern Diamond – Backed Rattlesnake (Crotalus adamanteus)
    Pattern: Diamonds
    Size: 3 – 7ft in length
    Characteristics: Has dark diamonds on its back outlined in cream. It also has black stripes outlined in cream running from both eyes to its jaw. This snake has a large rattle on its tale.
    Offspring: Easter Diamond-Backed Rattlesnakes give birth to live young. No egg laying here!
    Habitat: In urban areas, these snakes can be found on wooded areas and golf courses. They also like to live on the beach in tortoise and gopher burrows.
  2. Pygmy Rattlesnake (Sistrurus miliarius)
    Pattern: Blotched
    Size: 1 – 2.5ft in length
    Characteristics: Pygmy Rattlesnakes are shorter in length compared to other snakes but have thicker bodies which are grayish in color. They also have black blotches running down their backs and in between the black blotches may be orange stripes. Cream colored rattles are on the tips of their tails.
    Offspring: Gives birth to live young
    Habitat: gardens, brush piles, marshes, flooded flatwoods, upland forests and sandhills
    Diet: small birds, frogs, lizards, insects and small rodents
  3. Cottonmouth or Water Moccasin (Agkistrodon piscivorous)
    Pattern: Banded
    Size: 2.5 – 6ft max
    Characteristics: Young cottonmouths have splotched brown and golden colored splotched bands that fade as they get older. Older Cottonmouths are almost a solid black or dark gray color. When a cottonmouth is frightened or feels threatened, it will coil up, open its mouth really wide exposing its cotton colored mouth.
    Offspring: Gives birth to live babies.
    Habitat: Cottonmouths are usually found in or near water. You may see them in lakes, streams, rivers, brackish coastal marshes, ponds and even ditches. Any areas with congregating birds might also have cottonmouths nearby.
    Diet: Birds, bird eggs, turtles, frogs, fish, young alligators, squirrels, rabbits, rodents.
  4. Coral Snake (Micrurus fulvius)
    Pattern: Banded
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Non-Venomous

Pattern: Diamond Backed

  1. Black Racer or Black Snake (Coluber constrictor)
    There are two (2) black racer snakes in the Central Florida region. This one, however, is diamond backed, the other is solid black and is very often seen in our yards. The diamond backed Black Racer snake is often mistaken for the Pygmy Rattlesnake, which shares its diamond pattern but is usually grey in color.
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  2. Common Gartersnake (Thamnophis sirtalis)
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  3. Red Cornsnake or Red Ratsnake (Pantherophis guttatus)
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  4. Eastern, Yellow, or Everglades Ratsnake (Pantherophis alleghaniensis)
    Size:
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  5. Brown Watersnake (Nerodia Taxispilota)
  6. Pinesnake (Pituophis melanoleucus)
  7. Eastern Hog-nosed Snake (Heterodon platirhinos)
  8. Southern Hog-nosed Snake (Heterodon simus)
  9. Mole Kingsnake (Lampropeltis calligaster)
  10. Short-tailed Snake (Lampropeltis extenuate)

Pattern: Banded

  1. Southern or Banded Watersnake (Nerodia fasciata)
    This snake is often mistaken for the Cottonmouth, which is venomous.
  2. Scarlet Kingsnake (Lampropeltis elapsoides)
    This snake is often mistaken for the Coralsnake, which is venomous.
  3. Scarletsnake (Cemophora coccinea)
    This snake is often mistaken for the Coralsnake, which is venomous.
  4. Common Kingsnake (Lampropeltis getula)

Pattern: Striped

  1. Eastern Ribbonsnake (Thamnophis sauritus)
  2. Common Gartersnake (Thamnophis sirtalis)
  3. There are two Gartersnakes is Central Florida. The other Gartersnake has blotched skin rather than striped.
  4. Eastern, Yellow or Everglades Ratsnake (Pantherophis alleghaniensis)
  5. Stiped Crayfish Snake (Regina alleni)
  6. Saltmarsh Watersnake (Nerodia clarkia)
  7. Rainbow Snake (Farancia erytrogramma)

Patter: Solid Colored

  1. Black Racer or Blacksnake (Coluber constrictor)
  2. Ring-necked Snake (Diadophis punctatus)
  3. Red-bellied Mudsnake (Farancia abacura)
  4. Black Swampsnake (Seminatrix pygaea)
  5. Eastern Indigo Snake (Drymarchon couperi)
  6. Coachwhip
  7. Florida Green Watersnake
  8. Saltmarsh Watersnake (Nerodia clarkii)
  9. Glossy Crayfish Snake (Regina rigida)
  10. Florida Brownsnake (Storeria Victa)
  11. Red-Bellied Snake (Storeria occipitomaculata)
  12. Florida Crowned Snake (Tantilla relicta)
  13. Pine Woods Littersnake or Yellow-lipped Snake (Rhadinea flavilata)
  14. Smooth Earthsnake (Virginia valeriae)
  15. Rough Greensnake (Opheodrys aestivus)
  16. Brahminy Blindsnake (Ramphotyphlops braminus)

    There are two types of non-native snakes in Florida, one is the Brahminy Blindsnake and the other is the Beramise Python